Atlantic Voices | President Trump's First 100 Days
PUBLISHED: June 7, 2017
Atlantic Voices, Volume 7, Issue 05 – May 2017 During his campaign, Donald Trump openly questioned the usefulness of the Alliance, in addition to speaking friendly about Vladimir Putin. This alarmed some of his NATO partners, especially those in Eastern Europe. What kind of foreign and defence policy can they expect from the new U.S. President? 100 Days after his inauguration, what can be said about President Trump’s policies in these fields? How do they affect the Transatlantic relationship? The first article argues that, so far, the Trump Administration’s foreign policy is characterized by confusion rather than coherence. In the second article, the author argues that despite the “America First” rhetoric, the American foreign policy under President Trump can at this point still be seen as fairly conventional.  CONTENTS Trump in the White House: 100 Days of Confusion Mr. Philip Christian Ulrich attempts to discern what the defining features of President Trump’s foreign policy will be. This is no easy task considering that Donald Trump promised his electorate unpredictability during his campaign, a promise he seems intent to keep. 100 Days of "America First" Mr. Zebulon Carlander looks at whether the actions undertaken by the Trump Administration during its first 100 days in office are in line with the promises Donald Trump made as a candidate during his presidential campaign. How is Trump putting “America First”? https://www.slideshare.net/Atlantictreatyassociation/atlantic-voices-trumps-first-100-days
By: ATA Admin
Atlantic Voices | Solidarity Within the Alliance
PUBLISHED: April 22, 2017
Atlantic Voices, Volume 7, Issue 02 – February 2017 Article 5 is the backbone of NATO. In a time of (potential) threats coming from different directions, how to ensure solidarity within NATO? Adding to the urgency of finding common approaches is a phenomenon that is spreading throughout the member states, namely the rise of populism and nationalism. Combined with anti-establishment rhetoric it challenges the premises of the post-1945 values-based international liberal order, and can as such also pose a threat to NATO. The first article looks at the upcoming French elections, that could potentially have profound consequences for NATO-France relations, as well as for France’s solidarity with other Alliance members. In the second article, the trans-Atlantic values underpinning solidarity within NATO are under scrutiny. What are the trans-Atlantic values exactly and are they being upheld by all member states?  CONTENTS France and NATO: More of the Same, Or a Shock? Mr. Martin Michelot analyzes the views on of the five main candidates in the French elections on defense spending and NATO. He provides different scenarios for France-NATO relations, depending on which  candidate wins the elections on either April 23 or May 7, 2017. Our Shared Values Mr. John Jacobs looks at the shared values that underpin solidarity within the Alliance. What is specifically meant when we use the term “trans-Atlantic values”? And are these values really (still) upheld by all members of NATO, or do we see divisions within the Alliance? https://www.slideshare.net/Atlantictreatyassociation/atlantic-voices-solidarity-within-the-alliance      
By: ATA Admin
Atlantic Voices | NATO-EU Cooperation
PUBLISHED: March 15, 2017
Atlantic Voices, Volume 7, Issue 01 – January 2017 At the NATO Summit in Warsaw in July 2016, NATO and the EU issued a Joint Declaration which outlined areas for strengthened cooperation in light of common challenges to the East and South, including countering hybrid threats, enhancing resilience, defence capacity building, cyber defence, maritime security, and joint exercises. In December of the same year, they endorsed 42 concrete proposals in these seven areas of cooperation. This issue explores why it is so important that NATO and the EU work together and what their cooperation might look like in 2017. The first article takes a look at recent developments, including the changing U.S. Administration, that affect the NATO-EU relationship. These bring challenges, but also a number of distinct leadership opportunities for the EU. The second article places the threat of hybrid warfare, faced by both NATO and the EU, in an historical perspective. Are hybrid warfare tactics now more successful than ever? CONTENTS NATO-EU Cooperation in 2017: Demonstrating Clarity of Purpose Mr. Robert Baines addresses the obstacles that have been standing in the way of the implementation of the resolution, which include the lack of binding character of the text and the need for countries to develop Action Plans. Stronger Together: Facing Threats from Outside and Within Mr. Jordy Rutten looks at the role that reactionaries currently play in internal politics in several NATO member states and places this phenomenon in an historical perspective. Are hybrid warfare tactics now more successful than ever? https://www.slideshare.net/Atlantictreatyassociation/av-vol7-no-01-january-2017-final-versionpub
By: ATA Admin
Atlantic Voices | Implementing UNSCR 1325
PUBLISHED: December 22, 2016
Atlantic Voices, Volume 6, Issue 12 – December 2016 16 years ago, the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 was adopted, acknowledging the important role of women in international peace and security efforts. Therefore, this edition of Atlantic Voices celebrates the efforts made by our nations’ and their aim of improving inclusiveness, by zooming in on 15 years of implementation of UNSCR 1325. NATO member states’ success of securing inclusiveness in security and defence varies greatly, and therefore we raise the following question:  if preventing conflict is critical for peace, and investing in women’s rights is key to conflict prevention, why is it not yet a human rights obligation? The first article zooms in on Resolution 1325, and its enforceability deficit. The second article then takes a closer look at one of the leading NATO nation’s implementation of the Women, Peace and Security Resolution: Canada. Finally, this issue features an interview with Ambassador Marriët Schuurrman, the NATO Special Representative for Women, Peace and Security, who argues that in order for NATO’s peace efforts to be sustainable, they must be inclusive. CONTENTS Assessing UNSCR 1325 on Women, Peace and Security Ms. Yanitsa Stoeva addresses the obstacles that have been standing in the way of the implementation of the resolution, which include the lack of binding character of the text and the need for countries to develop Action Plans. Implementation of UNSCR 1325 the Canadian Way Ms. Mégane Visette details  the efforts that have been put in place by Canada to address gender inequalities in the army and other governmental services. NATO and the WPS Agenda: An Interview with Amb. Marriët Schuurman Ms. Marianne Copier interviewed Amb. Marriët Schuurman about her work as NATO Special Representative for Women Peace and Security. http://www.slideshare.net/Atlantictreatyassociation/atlantic-voices-implementing-unscr-1325   Atlantic Voices is always seeking new contributors. If you are a young researcher, subject expert or professional and feel you have a valuable contribution to make to the debate, then please get in touch. We are looking for papers, essays, and book reviews on issues of importance to the NATO Alliance. For details of how to submit your work please and for further enquiries please contact us.  
By: ATA Admin
Critical Infrastructure Protection Against Hybrid Warfare Security Related Challenges
PUBLISHED: December 20, 2016
The book contains the results, recommendations and best-practices of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) “Critical Infrastructure Protection Against Hybrid Warfare Security Related Challenges” organized by the Atlantic Treaty Association in partnership with the Swedish Atlantic Council and held in Stockholm from 18–20 May 2016. The workshop resulted in being an excellent setting for experts and stakeholders from government, academia and the private sector from the whole transatlantic region. The workshop provided a unique forum to address the protection of Critical Infrastructure and the hybrid warfare related-challenges for the Alliance.
By: ATA Admin
Atlantic Voices | Yemen: A Regional Problem With International Consequences
PUBLISHED: November 28, 2016
Atlantic Voices, Volume 6, Issue 11 – November 2016 One of the Arab world’s poorest nations, Yemen has been torn apart by a civil war since 2015. Opposing forces loyal to the internationally-recognised government of President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi and that of the Houthi rebel movement, the conflict also counts international components which make the situation harder to resolve. Often regarded as a proxy war between Saudi Arabia and Iran, it is hard to see a potential resolution of the conflict in the near future. Its continuation war contributes to the spread of terrorist networks in the region, and the ever growing number of Yemeni refugees will have a negative spill over effect on the neighboring countries. Yet another ceasefire was announced on 19. November 2016. The first article will focus on the power struggle entangled in the conflict; the second will focus on NATO’s ties with the Gulf region and the parties involved in the war in Yemen. CONTENTS A Regional Issue with International Consequences Mr. Neil Thompson analyzes the power struggles at play in the war in Yemen, focusing on the regional implications of the conflict as well as the role NATO could play in order to contain the consequences of the situation on the Bab el-Mandeb strait, a crucial point of passage for oil exports. NATO, Relying on Regional Actors in Yemen Ms. Flora Pidoux studies the elements at stake in the conflict of Yemen for the Alliance, highlighting NATO’s backing and reliance on regional powers such as Saudi Arabia. The potential role the Gulf Cooperation Council could play in bringing an end to the conflict is also examined. http://www.slideshare.net/Atlantictreatyassociation/atlantic-voices-yemen-a-regional-problem-with-international-consequences Atlantic Voices is always seeking new contributors. If you are a young researcher, subject expert or professional and feel you have a valuable contribution to make to the debate, then please get in touch. We are looking for papers, essays, and book reviews on issues of importance to the NATO Alliance. For details of how to submit your work please and for further enquiries please contact us.  
By: ATA Admin
Atlantic Voices | Partners Across the Globe: Stretching the Transatlantic Bond
PUBLISHED: October 25, 2016
Atlantic Voices, Volume 6, Issue 10 – October 2016 Since its creation, NATO has tremendously changed. Starting from an Alliance that connected Western Europe with North America to deter threats coming from the USSR, NATO has come to encompass more and more members over the years. Beyond the expansion of the membership, the Allies also aimed at spreading their security ideal further, forced to acknowledge that their safety was vulnerable to the stability of other regions. With threats arising in its direct proximity, NATO thus set up the Partnership for Peace and the Mediterranean Dialogue  to enhance cooperation on tackling threats arising in the broad European and North African regions. However, NATO has become increasingly vulnerable to attacks coming from farther, as illustrated by the 9/11 attacks. In light of this, handpicked countries, referred to as ‘Partners across the Globe’, have been given preferential terms to cooperate on key security issues with NATO. The first article discusses the partnership with Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan; the second focuses on Japan’s and South Korea’s bond with the Alliance; and the third dwells on the cooperation between the Allies, Australia and New Zealand. CONTENTS Shifting the Sands of the Transatlantic Bond Mr. Roger Hilton analyzes the partnerships that tie NATO with Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan and which aims at tackling terrorism at the source. Extending the Bond Eastward Mrs. Floor Doppen studies the partnership between NATO, Japan and South Korea, which emerged in reaction to North Korea’s nuclear threats. Australia and New Zealand: Pacific Countries, Atlantic Partners Mr. Matt Bowers  discusses the bond that Australia and New Zealand share with the Allies, which is based on governance similarities as well as comparable security threats and a commitment to global security. http://www.slideshare.net/Atlantictreatyassociation/atlantic-voices-partners-across-the-globe-stretching-the-transatlantic-bond Atlantic Voices is always seeking new contributors. If you are a young researcher, subject expert or professional and feel you have a valuable contribution to make to the debate, then please get in touch. We are looking for papers, essays, and book reviews on issues of importance to the NATO Alliance. For details of how to submit your work please and for further enquiries please contact us.  
By: ATA Admin
Atlantic Voices | Focus on the Mediterranean: Threats to the Southern Flank
PUBLISHED: September 30, 2016
Atlantic Voices, Volume 6, Issue 9 – September 2016 The volatility of some of NATO’s closer neighbors has increasingly been having security implications for the Alliance.  Due to its rapprochement with the West, Ukraine has captured most of the media attention, with the Alliance’s Southern Flank being pushed to the sidelines. Equally concerning, the North Coast of Africa has been going through particular turmoil, from the Arab spring to the ongoing Syrian war, which have directly affected the Euro-Atlantic with migration and terrorism. Despite all these threats, NATO has been indirectly involved in countering them by giving more opportunity to individual countries and by backing partners of the Mediterranean Dialogue through capability building. NATO has thus  been paying more attention to the South, responding to the ever growing threat of terrorism and modernization necessity. Operation Active Endeavour, the Alliance’s patrolling mission in the Mediterranean will soon be replaced by Sea Guardian, further explained in the first article. The Libyan crisis will be the object of the second article, which aims at explaining the Alliance’s lack of involvement, despite the dramatic consequences it has for regional security. CONTENTS Fifteen Years of Active Endeavour: Evaluation of NATO’s Mission Mr. Nicholas A. Glavin analyzes the results of Operation Active Endeavour in the Mediterranean. After 15 years of service, Operation Sea Guardian will supersede in an effort to secure the Alliance’s Southern maritime front. Libya, 5 Years Later Mr. John G.L.J. Jacobs assesses the current situation of Libya five years after the destitution of the Qadhafi regime. Five years after the NATO-led Operation Unified Protector the Alliance is unlikely to deploy again, preferring capacity building rather than direct involvement in the civil war. http://www.slideshare.net/Atlantictreatyassociation/focus-on-the-mediterranean-threats-to-the-southern-flank Atlantic Voices is always seeking new contributors. If you are a young researcher, subject expert or professional and feel you have a valuable contribution to make to the debate, then please get in touch. We are looking for papers, essays, and book reviews on issues of importance to the NATO Alliance. For details of how to submit your work please and for further enquiries please contact us.  
By: ATA Admin
Atlantic Voices | The Warsaw Summit
PUBLISHED: August 31, 2016
Atlantic Voices, Volume 6, Issue 8 – August 2016 Two years ago, the Wales Summit marked a historic turn for NATO as the Alliance was forced to recognize that its European territory was threatened for the first time in 25 years; menaces emerging from the South and the East made NATO vulnerable despite so many years of peace. The Summit in Newport in June 2014 acted as the first step of what will certainly be a long process of securing the Euro-Atlantic again.  It also reasserted the fundamental values the Alliance is based on: collective defense, crisis management and cooperative security. So, in two years, what has changed? The official communiqué of the Warsaw Summit announced that the Allies have worked together to secure the borders of NATO, while recognizing the hybrid nature of threats posed to them. Russia is then directly  pointed out as challenging the security of the Alliance. This issue analyzes the focal points of the Summit: the first article focuses on the security situation in the Eastern Flank ; the second article dwells on the Alliance’s new integration of the cyber sphere as its 5th operative domain; and the last article details Macedonia’s membership prospects throughout the years. CONTENTS From the Warsaw Pact to the Warsaw Summit Mr. Mateusz Krupczyński explores the evolution of the security environment of the Eastern Flank from the creation of NATO to today. Russia’s Use of Cyber Warfare in the Conflicts in Georgia and Ukraine Mr. Luka Mgeladze focuses on cyber security which has been largely discussed during the Summit in an effort to integrate this operative domain into the Alliance’s field of action. Security After the Warsaw Summit – Prospects and Expectations for Macedonia Ms. Marija Jankuloska & Mr. Ilija Djugumanov analyze Macedonia’s membership prospect and involvement in the Alliance. http://www.slideshare.net/Atlantictreatyassociation/atlantic-voices-the-warsaw-summit Atlantic Voices is always seeking new contributors. If you are a young researcher, subject expert or professional and feel you have a valuable contribution to make to the debate, then please get in touch. We are looking for papers, essays, and book reviews on issues of importance to the NATO Alliance. For details of how to submit your work please and for further enquiries please contact us.  
By: ATA Admin
Atlantic Voices | NATO & the South Caucasus
PUBLISHED: July 23, 2016
Atlantic Voices, Volume 6, Issue 7 – July 2016 Located at the crossroad between Europe , Russia and the Middle East, and in between the Caspian and the Black Sea, the Caucasus is in a very advantageous location, which has encouraged regional powers from both the East and the West to influence it.  Traditionally in Russia’s sphere of influence, Armenia, Georgia and Azerbaijan are today split between two worlds. To the West, NATO offers stability and development, while Moscow appeals to their historical connection. Political instability and regional tensions make this region unstable  as well as very heterogeneous. Each of the countries seem to have built their own models of development and political systems. Borders are also contested in the regions, as illustrated by the two frozen conflicts of Nagorno Karabakh between Azerbaijan and Armenia, and the secessionist regions of South Ossetia and Abkhazia. This issue explores the complexity of the region: the first article focuses on the frozen conflicts; the second on Georgia’s halted access to the Alliance despite strong commitment; the third one focuses on the implications of the region for Europe’s energy security. CONTENTS The South Caucasus’s Still Frozen Conflits Mr. Xavier Follebouckt explores the frozen conflicts of the region and how they are utilized by Moscow to prevent the countries from joining NATO. Welcoming a Caucasian Guest to the Alliance? Mr. Roger Hilton focuses on Georgia, which has widely contributed to NATO’s operations and abided to its policies but whose accession to membership to the Alliance remains uncertain due to political constraints. Energy Security in the South Caucasus Ms. Kamilla Solieva analyzes the importance of the South Caucasus for Europe’s energy security in times of increasing tensions with their traditional energy provider, Russia http://www.slideshare.net/Atlantictreatyassociation/atlantic-voices-nato-the-south-caucasus Atlantic Voices is always seeking new contributors. If you are a young researcher, subject expert or professional and feel you have a valuable contribution to make to the debate, then please get in touch. We are looking for papers, essays, and book reviews on issues of importance to the NATO Alliance. For details of how to submit your work please and for further enquiries please contact us.  
By: ATA Admin
NATO in 3D: Deterrence, Defense and Dialogue
PUBLISHED: July 7, 2016
First published in "NATO Summit 2016 – Strengthening Peace and Security"  An official publication of the Atlantic Treaty Association; supported by NATO's Public Diplomacy Division   Sixty years since the adoption of “The Report of the Committee of Three on Non-Military Cooperation in NATO”, authored by the Ministers Gaetano Martino, Halvard Lange and Laster B. Pearson, the Heads of State and Government of the Alliance gather in Warsaw for a Summit that will represent a cornerstone in the NATO adaptation to the new complex security scenario. A 360-degree response is needed to cope with the interconnected threats emerging simultaneously from the Eastern and Southern flanks of the Alliance. Moreover, a similarly wide approach is necessary to combine both the political and military dimension of the Alliance and to effectively meet the extensive range of the new security tasks. The Warsaw Summit will offer a vision of the future of NATO in 3D: Deterrence, Defense, and Dialogue. Deterrence needs to be reconsidered in a modern way, on both its conventional and nuclear dimensions. Defense of our free democracies, populations and territories is worrisome as it is constantly tested by state and non‑state actors and by violent terrorist actions as well. Thus, a strengthening of collective defense is necessary while a comprehensive approach is required to address the multifaceted security challenges of the present crisis management operations. Moreover, new hybrid warfare tactics and asymmetric threats are emerging with unprecedented rapidity and must be confronted by high readiness forces, a faster decision making process, and a genuine spirit of cooperative security with other partners and international institutions, first and foremost the European Union. In fact, “No state, however powerful, can guarantee its security and its welfare by national action alone”. It appeared evident sixty years ago to the Three Wise Men, and it is particularly true in the present days affected by security challenges without borders, such as the cyber threat, migration, and climate change. Yet, defense must be credible and needs to rely on modern capabilities sustained by stable defense budgets that cannot decrease anymore under the 2% of national GDP. Dialogue remains essential to improve cooperative security with partners as well as to complement deterrence and defense. In 1967, Minister Pierre Harmel released a farsighted “Report on the Future Tasks of the Alliance” that effectively introduced the notion of deterrence and dialogue, setting the scene for NATO’s first steps toward a more cooperative approach to security. A strategic move that should represent an inspiring model for restoring a partnership with the Russian Federation. Besides an external feature of dialogue and its cooperative security approach, there is an even more relevant internal dimension of political consultation and cooperation among NATO members that can be further enhanced. As stated by the Three Wise Men, “From the very beginning of NATO, then, it was recognised that while defence cooperation was the first and most urgent requirement, this was not enough. It has also become increasingly realised since the Treaty was signed that security is today far more than a military matter. The strengthening of political consultation and economic cooperation, the development of resources, progress in education and public understanding, all these can be as important, or even more important, for the protection of the security of a nation, or an alliance, as the building of a battleship or the equipping of an army.” Since 1954, these are the very domains and tasks unremittingly addressed by the Atlantic Treaty Association (ATA) across NATO members and partner countries. At present, ATA has increased its outreach and is cooperating with countries in the Mediterranean and the Middle East on joint programs aimed at adopting common solutions to common security challenges. In 1956, the Report of the Committee of Three acknowledged the importance of ATA’s role in forging an Atlantic community by promoting a better understanding of the Alliance and its enduring goals. Since then, with more than 500 programs per year across 37 different countries, ATA and its youth division YATA, is connecting NATO with the civil society and keeping new generations, experts, media, parliamentarians, and decision makers informed and committed to maintaining an effective Alliance. In fact, while military operations and exercises are the most visible aspects of NATO, the real strength and lifeblood of the NATO forces originates from the allied solidarity stemming from the political consultations and from a less visible but vital link with the civil society. ATA remains steadfast in its commitment as in Warsaw, even more than sixty years ago, “A sense of community must bind the people as well as the institutions of the Atlantic nations”.    
By: ATA Admin
Atlantic Voices | One Year after the Iran Nuclear Deal
PUBLISHED: June 23, 2016
Atlantic Voices, Volume 6, Issue 6 – June 2016 In July 2015, a much expected nuclear deal was finally reached between Iran and the P5+1 (Permanent members of the United Nations Security Council and Germany), announcing the lifting of international sanctions against Tehran in exchange for the country’s agreement to limit its nuclear activity to energy purposes. This issue focuses on the impact the deal has had on world security. The lifting of sanctions against Iran has acted as a game changer for the country which is now able to openly trade with world powers as well as have a voice on the international scene. Iran is now able to export its large oil resources across the globe, notably to China and Europe, which has had negative impacts for the price of crude oil and thus for other oil exporting countries like Saudi Arabia and Russia. On top of traditionally tense relations with Riyadh, Tehran’s disregard for OPEC’s guidelines and increased influence in Syria can be expected to further contribute to the region’s instability. Despite the deal, the nuclear threat has not disappeared and remains a concern for NATO which is in a dire need to redefine its nuclear strategy in face of Russia’s assertive attitude and other actors’ threatening attitude. CONTENTS One Year On: Iran and the World Mr. Neil Thompson examines the state of Iran's relations with the major world and regional powers in the year since its nuclear deal was signed with the international community, and how the lifting of sanctions has affected regional security after Iran’s return to the international scene. Incompatible Needs: Denuclearization vs. Nuclear Deterrence Ms. Flora Pidoux analyses how short term security priorities are forcing NATO to revise its nuclear strategy despite the West’s support for  denuclearization, arms reduction and non-proliferation. http://fr.slideshare.net/Atlantictreatyassociation/atlantic-voices-one-year-after-the-iran-nuclear-deal Atlantic Voices is always seeking new contributors. If you are a young researcher, subject expert or professional and feel you have a valuable contribution to make to the debate, then please get in touch. We are looking for papers, essays, and book reviews on issues of importance to the NATO Alliance. For details of how to submit your work please and for further enquiries please contact us.  
By: ATA Admin

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The Atlantic Treaty Association (ATA) is an organization of 38 national chapters that, since 1954 has been conducting analyses, training, education, and information activities on foreign affairs and security issues relevant to the Atlantic Alliance. ATA draws together political leaders, diplomats, civilian and military officers, academics, economic actors as well as young professionals and students in an effort to further the values set forth in the North Atlantic Treaty.